Slavery ended officially in the 1860s yet some still debate it’s merits

After fifty years of waving it defiantly in the face of the federal government, Southern conservatives are tripping all over themselves to take down the Confederate battle flags from their state buildings and monuments. This doesn’t mean the conversation is over.

Slavery ended in the 1860s, but just yesterday I read a statement from a Republican elected official somewhere down South. He said slavery was the first “Social Security” system, that it provided cradle-to-grave care for the slaves.

Slavery ended officially in the 1860s yet some still debate it’s merits. So yes, the conversation about the Confederate battle flag, what it represents, and where it should or should not be displayed will continue. But hopefully it will be relegated to invite-only gatherings of drunken bigots, back alleys, and country-club watering holes, where it belongs.

The Confederate battle flag belongs in museums, private homes, and private collections. It has no more business being displayed on public buildings than the Soviet hammer and sickle.
~ Booth McKeown (June 25, 2015)

About Randy Sandberg

Whole Food Plant-Powered Vegan Athlete